A Note about (and information for) the Fathers

TRCA held its first public information meeting on a Thursday night in October, and we’ve spent the time since then pondering that evening. In time, we hope to share many of the thoughts and ideas that followed, but the first observation to note is this: There were a significant number of men, at a meeting led by men, called there to discuss the education of their families.

Fatherhood is more than donating genetic material and a pay check. Procreation and physical provision are critical roles of fathers, no doubt (see I Timothy 5:8), but that’s where a father’s obligations begin. We are called to provide our families with cultural and spiritual formation and to protect our families from a variety of evils. I refer you to what Job, a rather successful and manly gentleman, did for his family every day (see Job 1:5). The cultural and spiritual imperatives of Deuteronomy 6 were primarily directed to the men of Israel.

This is to take nothing away from the many mothers in the crowd that evening. We are grateful for each one, as I’m sure the husband of each one is. Let’s be honest: if the formation and education of children were attempted without mothers, the human race wouldn’t last long. And this is not to take away from the fathers who enable and support their wives in the homeschool endeavor – and did so again that Thursday night.

Noting that so many men expressed interest in the education of their children, engaged in thoughtful conversation, and offered various ideas and support for TRCA makes us pause for two reasons: first, we commend the fathers for actively pursuing their God-given callings; and second, we are emboldened to press forward with the vision for TRCA.

If you’re a man looking to learn more about classical education, here’s a great place to start: The Art of Manliness blog. This blog and podcast should be on your lists and feeds, if not already. Here are some samples worth your time:

Comments or questions? Send us a note.

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